Bruadarach

Scottish Gaelic: Dreamer, Visionary

Category: Photography

Scotland 2018 Calendar

I’ve been taking thousands of photographs in Scotland since I first visited in 2009. Working on a calendar was only a natural thing to do. Maybe one day I’ll make a photo book as well. 🙂

Enjoy!

At the moment, it’s available directly through Lulu:

http://www.lulu.com/shop/katharina-maimer/scotland-2018/calendar/product-23334260.html 

 

 

366 Photo Challenge

This year, and with the help of my new camera, I decided to take on one of the biggest photography challenges of them all – 366 days. Even bigger than usual, in a leap year.

I have found some thematic challenges to try in-between, but the biggest one is going to be picking the camera up each day and find something worth taking a picture of.

If you want to follow my progress, you can find the pictures on Flickr 🙂
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kmaimer/albums/72157662986074056/with/23480460873/

 

2016-01-01

 

 

Christmas Markets in Vienna, 2015 Edition

XmasCover E 2015When I started blogging about Christmas markets in winter 2012, I never thought it would become a book, let alone I would be publishing a second edition three years later.

After it was first published, I still wanted to go to new markets or revisit old ones, and I took my camera and Mick with me, to be safe. The plan was to update it for 2014, but we moved house and the project landed in the queue.

I was sure though, once the new opening dates and times were published I would manage a 2015 edition – and here it is! 🙂

Updated infos, seven new markets, and many more photos!

Amazon.com / Amazon.co.uk / Amazon.de

Smashwords (and many more…)

Mick Photo A Day

9678711011_ed521f2922_o When I did the Photo A Day challenges last November and in June, I found that everyone loved pictures of my husband Mick. I obviously knew how photogenic he was, but the reception was very positive. On top of that, I don’t have much experience taking photos of people other than snapshots of him in front of something. That’s why for September, I challenged myself to take all photo prompts with Mick in them. The fact that we spent most of September on holiday in Scotland helped of course. It would’ve been much harder taking a photo a day of him which fits the prompt if we were working and the only possibility would be to take pictures in the evening, mostly at home.

Three weeks in Scotland gave me plenty of opportunity to take fitting pictures of him, experiment with portrait photography, show off the stunning countryside and even leave me with a few photos to fill the rest of the month when we were back home in Vienna.

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After 30 days of photos from Mick, I’d say I’ve learned a lot about taking photos of people. It’s easiest with a willing model obviously and I’m very thankful that Mick was happy to go along, jump along, pose and do silly things to fit the different prompts. Making whoever you take photos of feel comfortable enough to do creative or weird things is the best way to get candid shots – even if the person is looking into the camera. You get the feeling they are just talking or gesturing to the person behind the camera, not thinking about the photo itself.

All of the shots were taken with natural light, which is quite easy with Scotland being one of those places where you get quickly changing lightning and most of it is fantastic. For now, I’m taking a break from the daily photo prompts, maybe getting back to it after a few months have passed. I hope you enjoy the photos I took of Mick around Scotland! 🙂

You can find all the photos in the Flickr Album “September Photo A Day“.

Cookbook Challenge 4 – Austro Tapas

Next up is the Austro Tapas cookbook: basically classical Austrian dishes in small and handy versions. The added challenge, which Mick gave me, was to make it with breadcrumbs. Since they are very prominent in Austrian cuisine, I thought this was going to be easy. I could just pick some kind of Schnitzel, since it was going to be used for lunch, and do that in tiny. Boy, I was wrong.

For some weird reason there weren’t any Schnitzel dishes in it, and though some desserts had breadcrumbs on it – and battered mushrooms which isn’t much of a lunch in itself – there wasn’t much I could pick from. What I did find was a cheese cordon bleu, which I decided to use as inspiration. In general I felt that it was an Austrian (ish) cookbook where everything was just smaller. It feels a bit like the new cookbooks for the small pots – same thing but smaller. Not too inspiring. I think it works for desserts better though, where you can then prepare a range of smaller desserts. So I think I’ll have to come back to this cookbook for a dessert recipe, which then I shall follow a bit more…

But now onto what I ended up making:

 

Rustic Cordon Bleu

4 pork escalopes (you can use veal too which is the classical one, but pork is more flavourful)
2 eggs
Plain Flour
Salt
Breadcrumbs (made out of dry white bread or bought if you can get decent ones)
4 big slices of cheese (something with lots of flavour, I used smoked cheese)
Slices of Smoked Bacon (not what you’d get as ‘bacon’ in the US or the UK. I mean proper smoked bacon. I used smoked garlic bacon.)
Half a Lemon

Green Salad
Red Wine Vinegar
Pumpkin Seed Oil

 

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First up, tenderise the meat with a meat hammer. It needs to be properly beaten so the slices get a bit thinner. Then, depending on the size, you can use two Schnitzel or fold one up. Since I was making Tapas (ish) Cordon Bleu, I folded them. After hammering the meat was thin and larger, so it was still decent sized even in half.

Spread the bacon out on the meat, covering it up. Then the cheese in the middle. It shouldn’t be filled too thick, or it would just fall apart when you make the batter. A classical Cordon Bleu is made with ham and cheese, so you can vary the filling.

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Fold the Cordon Bleu and use toothpicks to hold them together. Then hammer once more to get them a bit flatter. For the batter put flour in one bowl, two eggs mixed with salt on the second, and the breadcrumbs in the third. Use deep bowls if possible, as the flour and breadcrumbs may end up everywhere. How much you’ll end up needing, largely depends on the size of the Cordon Bleu. The same is true for Schnitzel, which you can also make following this recipe. Just don’t stuff anything in it.

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First, the meat goes into the flour. Make sure it’s properly covered and shake the excess flour off. Next up is the egg-salt mix. Again, the whole Cordon Bleu should be covered. If you rub your hands in the flour before starting, you’ll avoid your fingers getting clogged up with eggy crumbs!

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The last step of the batter is the breadcrumbs. Cover the Cordon Bleu completely, and apply some pressure to make sure the breadcrumbs stick to it. Make sure to cook them straight away; if you leave them lying around too long, the batter will end up coming off the meat. Once you press the whole thing a bit, the toothpicks can come out again.

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Use a deep pan with about half a finger thick of oil. Wait until it’s sizzling hot – best checked with some loose breadcrumbs – and put the Cordon Bleus in. If the fat isn’t hot enough, it will just soak into the batter and leave it greasy. Bake it about 3 minutes on each side, until the batter is golden brown.

As a side dish I prepared a traditional green salad. The one I made is customary for the South of Austria. After washing the salad leaves, you put some salt, red wine vinegar and pumpkin seed oil on it. The latter is a speciality from my home region of Styria. It’s a very dark green thick oil, which can be used for many dishes but not as oil to fry food in.

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All in all, the cookbook was a good inspiration, and like I initially said, I will probably try one of their desserts next. The Rustic Cordon Bleu though was fantastic. I usually have it with a sprinkle of lemon over the top of it. I should’ve used more cheese though – maybe two slices each or even goat cheese if I had managed to cut it thinly enough to get it in. I did enjoy it a lot though, the garlic bacon went very nicely with… well, really everything. I cannot believe I had never made Cordon Bleu before – I always thought it was more complicated than this!

Christmas Markets Part 3 – Schloss Belvedere

You can find the Christmas Market Reviews now as an eBook, which gets updated each year!

http://bruadarach.at/writing/ 

 


Christmas Markets auf einer größeren Karte anzeigen

Christmas Markets Part 2 – Schönbrunn Castle

You can find the Christmas Market Reviews now as an eBook, which gets updated each year!

http://bruadarach.at/writing/ 


Christmas Markets auf einer größeren Karte anzeigen

Christmas Markets Part 1 – Rathausplatz, Vienna

You can find the Christmas Market Reviews now as an eBook, which gets updated each year!

http://bruadarach.at/writing/ 


Christmas Markets auf einer größeren Karte anzeigen

 

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